The Life-giving Greeting of the Father

What is in a greeting? Let’s examine today the life-giving greeting of the Father.

In nearly all New Testament epistles, the authors greet their fellow believers wishing them grace and peace from God, our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ.

Here is one example from the Ephesians. “To God’s holy people in Ephesus, the faithful in Christ Jesus: Grace and peace to you from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.” (Ephesians 1:1-2)

The Life-Giving Greeting of the Father

Through the mouth of Apostle Paul, the Father greets His children. In just one sentence, God defines who we are, what is our calling, and how we are to live and assures us of His provision of everything we need to fulfill this calling. We are God’s faithful saints in Christ, recipients of His grace and peace (His salvation and redemption), and one in Him.

We are God's faithful saints in Christ, recipients of His grace and peace (His salvation and redemption), and one in Him. #identity #Christianliving #bgbg2 Click To Tweet

Greetings influence us more than we can imagine. In my childhood, my father did not greet me–he just shouted my name, accompanied by belittling statements. That sucked the life out of me. Years later, it was just my name. And finally, in middle age, my father greeted me and wished me good. At last, he was able to express his love and acceptance, giving me what I need.

The story of our broken and restored relationship is captured in my father’s greetings. But it is incomparable with the grand story hidden in the greeting of our heavenly Father. This is a story of identity, purpose, and provision.

Remember to pin me for later!

The Life-giving Greeting of the Father

Our Identity and Position – Saints

The early Church did not call themselves Christians. In the Bible, the title most often used was “saints”. The word translated from Greek means “holy, consecrated to God, sacred, pious, set apart“.

Because God is holy and we belong to Him, as newborn believers we are infused with His nature and covered by the righteousness of Christ, called to live fully dedicated lives to Him. (1 Peter 1:16) We are God’s holy people.

Our Calling – to Be Faithful

Our calling in this life is to be faithful citizens of God’s Kingdom. This means to live a set-apart life in accordance with our new identity, imitating the ways of God and doing His word. We can accomplish this only when we allow the Holy Spirit to guide us and renew our minds according to the truth. (Romans 12:2)

To be faithful, loyal, and steadfast means to commit to the process of growth and transformation, of knowing God and His grace. It is the daily choice to seek His kingdom and righteousness first. (Matthew 6:33)

To be faithful, loyal, and steadfast means to commit to the process of growth and transformation, of knowing God and His grace. #spiritualgrowth #Biblestudy #bgbg2 Click To Tweet

Gods Encompassing Provision to Fulfill Our Calling

God’s provision to fulfill our calling is His grace and peace, and the oneness in Him. His grace is the power to live a righteous life of a faithful saint. We have already received grace for salvation, but now we need the grace to overcome, to pass through the trials of life, obeying His word and maturing, working out the salvation of our souls. (Philippians 2:12)

God’s peace is His awesome protection: peace of mind, calmness, confidence despite circumstances (Philippians 4:6-7), and wholeness (the redemption of our brokenness). When Paul wishes the faithful saints grace and peace, he proclaims to them the mystery of the Gospel in miniature. This is the life-giving greeting of the Father.

The Oneness in Christ

Grace (charis) was a typical Greek greeting at the time Apostle Paul wrote his message while peace (shalom) was a typical Hebrew greeting. Greeks were part of the Gentiles and we know that Jews were God’s chosen people.

The combination of these two greetings is a powerful symbol of our oneness in Christ. Because “there is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is no male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.” (Galatians 3:28)

Your Turn

Do you see yourself as a faithful saint? Do you believe God has provided everything you need to live the righteous, holy life He has called you to? Share in the comments and on social media. Thanks!

When Paul wishes the faithful saints grace and peace, he proclaims to them the mystery of the Gospel in miniature. This is the life-giving greeting of the Father. #grace #peace #encouragement Click To Tweet

This page contains affiliate links, which means I make a small commission at no extra cost to you. The commission I make from these items will help keep this blog going. Thank you!

Sign-up-Newsletter-1

I send my newsletter “Keep the Faith” every two weeks. I share with you first the newest blog post, recommended books and articles, and the newest freebies and resources to keep the faith.  

To receive the newsletter, please subscribe below or click HERE to get my FREE workbook “Committing to Your Calling in 10 Days!”. I can’t wait to share it personally!

Want to know more about me before you sign up? You can read about me HERE and about the purpose and topics of this blog HERE.

Follow on Bloglovin

Spread the word

18 Replies to “The Life-giving Greeting of the Father”

  1. I was familiar with Shalom, but I didn’t know Grace was a Greek greeting. What a wonderful way to include both Jew and Gentile! I like getting back to the true meaning of the word “saint.”

  2. I never thought much about the phrase “grace and peace to you”. Thank you for explaining the significance. I always appreciate your thought-provoking posts.

  3. Hi Hadassah,

    I love the history and information you’ve shared behind these greetings. They are so rich and beautiful–far more lovely than a simple “hello”. The gospel in “miniature”. Beautiful!

    Blessings to you,
    Tammy

  4. Thank you for this study on the greetings! I’ve always wondered why they were so long and windy—but knowing they contain encouragement, identity, and hope Hera me see them differently. I think the word ‘saint’ has morphed into something different from the original. Today it smacks of perfection rather than belonging and believer. Therefore, I’ve never thought of myself as a saint.

    1. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Anita! You are right: the word “saint” has morphed into something different than the original. But it is good to go back to the biblical meaning and embrace our God-given identity.

  5. Grace and Peace to you and yours. I love this share. It was a few years ago now, that I recognized the incredible way that Paul greeted his readers and friends in his Letters.
    Although I never gave it much thought, I enjoyed the fact that when I would read one of his Letters, he greeted me the way he did.
    It is so interesting and good to read into the depth of those simple sentences.

    1. Thanks so much for your comment! Yes, the greeting is very simple and yet holding profound truth! I am happy that you found this article helpful.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.